A nomological conception of knowledge

It could be unsettling for a teacher to be unsure of the nature of knowledge, yet questions relating to the concept appear frequently on Twitter. Here, using David Didau’s proposition: ‘Knowledge is what we think with and about’ as my starting point, I hope to provide some clarity on the issues and put forward a conception… Continue reading A nomological conception of knowledge

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Some remarks on measurements and judgements in schools

The following are just notes... There are various purposes of measuring things in schools, but often, it comes down to holding people accountable- the teachers, the students. Another way of looking at it is to try to get people to be better, to improve, this presupposes that one knows what ‘improvement’ looks like. If we… Continue reading Some remarks on measurements and judgements in schools

Plaça de l’Arquebisbe

Plaça de l’Arquebisbe, containing nothing of particular historical note, is a quiet little square except for the odd handful of lost tourists. The Archbishop’s grand mansion standing at the southern end governs the movement of the shadows, reminding the well-to-do apartments that form the east and west sides of their place, and intimidating the grand… Continue reading Plaça de l’Arquebisbe

ResearchED Rugby 2017: Value, Character, and Virtue in Education

In this post, I briefly discuss what we mean when we are talking about values, and virtues. I then suggest an alternative conception. During her keynote speech at ResearchED Rugby, Nicky Morgan argued for what she perceived to be the importance of ‘character education’, the teaching of values, or character to the students. My first… Continue reading ResearchED Rugby 2017: Value, Character, and Virtue in Education

Concerning @Bennewmark’s post on empathy in history teaching

Ben Newmark argued that neither empathy nor moral lessons are valid aims of the study of History. I completely agree. I do, however, accept that one might feel a slight discomfort whilst reading what he wrote. Here, I would briefly like to explain why I believe such discomfort is misplaced, and I would like to… Continue reading Concerning @Bennewmark’s post on empathy in history teaching

In praise of educational pluralism and giraffes

Introduction (I would like to apologise for referring to people by their first names - I do not mean to be over-familiar, but to refer to them by both first name and surname seemed clumsy, and last name seemed awkward. I shall correct this if it offends.) Last week, there was a right old barney… Continue reading In praise of educational pluralism and giraffes

Concerning Greg Ashman’s argument concerning causality in education

Greg Ashman makes the following argument concerning causality in education: If (P) we cannot make any causal claims about different educational approaches, then (Q) anything goes apart from methods barred on ethical grounds. [Implied] (Q) is insufficient. Therefore, (not-P) must be true.   I fully agree with 1 but disagree with 2, and 3. My… Continue reading Concerning Greg Ashman’s argument concerning causality in education

Concerning David Didau’s position re. the place of knowledge in education

David Didau states describes his position regarding knowledge in the curriculum as follows: Knowledge is both what we thing with and about. We cannot think with or about something we don’t know. The more we know about something, the more sophisticated our thinking. Whilst I agree with what he says heuristically, I think David Didau… Continue reading Concerning David Didau’s position re. the place of knowledge in education