The dishonesty of abstraction

Recently, given the political tensions here in Spain, I have been thinking a lot about the nature of impartiality. I began by describing why I felt the 'fact/opinion' dichotomy wasn't that useful. Then, using the ideas of James P. Carse I offered a suggestion for an expression of the ultimate ethical rule. i.e. that our obligation… Continue reading The dishonesty of abstraction

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Computers, marking and the ultimate ethical rule

I. Introduction I was struck by a recent post by Greg Ashman about a plan to use computers to mark literature papers. I fully agree with his assessment of the situation, but in the context of  this post by Michael Fordham (about the unteachability of skills) and this post by Ben Newmark (about the purpose of education… Continue reading Computers, marking and the ultimate ethical rule

Concerning teacher impartiality: Why the ‘Opinion’ vs ‘Fact’ distinction is not that useful

I teach in Spain, and Spain is currently in the midst of a constitutional crisis. Being ‘impartial’ is tricky in the calmest of times, but in tumultuous times like these it’s a minefield. This is especially so for those of us who teach subjects that are sodden with passion and blood of freedoms lost and… Continue reading Concerning teacher impartiality: Why the ‘Opinion’ vs ‘Fact’ distinction is not that useful